Thursday, September 2, 2010

Just what the Gulf needs...more oil...

From The New York Times...
Oil Sheen Seen Near Damaged Platform in Gulf of Mexico



NEW ORLEANS — An oil platform exploded and caught fire in the Gulf of Mexico on Thursday morning, touching off flurries of conflicting reports about sightings of oil slicks in the water and whether any workers had been injured in the blast.

Coast Guard officials said a sheen measuring one mile long by 100 feet wide had been spotted near the damaged production platform on Thursday afternoon. But the platform’s owner said the structure had not been producing at the time of the accident, and a spokesman for the company, Mariner Energy, told CNBC that there was no evidence of any spill.

The prospect of a second oil leak would be unnerving for a region still recovering from the environmental and financial toll of the months-long spill at a BP well this year. The explosion occurred around 9 a.m. Thursday, touching off a fire that had been contained but not extinguished by the afternoon. The production platform was positioned in relatively shallow waters — 340 feet deep — and to the west of where a drilling rig leased by BP blew up and sank in April, killing 11 people and touching off an environmental calamity....


Will we ever learn?

1 comment:

Chris Petrak said...

With your previous post, words are unnecessary - with this post, they fail. I am afraid of answering your last question. Responding to your last comment on my post, I agreed about shorebirds - they do stand still for a while. But I'm too far from the coast to see them enough to get real comfortable, alto it's starting to come - will dotage come first. We begin our hawk count on Putney Mtn as soon as the storm passes. They come and go so fast, but over a number of years one begins to get the feel. I think hawks in flight may be the origin of giss - we certainly were talking in those terms long before the term became familiar.